Posts Tagged ‘Portland’

“The woman declared that she was all for the building of a drug and alcohol rehab center next to her city apartment except that the proposed height of the building would cast shade on her kale plants and ruin her plants.”

Portland, Oregon was the host of the 2016 National Healthcare for the Homeless Conference and Policy symposium.  I found it to be a fascinating mix of liberal residual hippee mentalities mixed among upscale microbreweries.  A blue city residing in a largely rural red state. The first thing that struck me about Portland was how clean the city was. It’s beautiful to look at with its detailed architecture, Mount Hood peering over you in the background and the Willamette River hugging some of the neatest reformed parts of town. Freshly potted plants sprinkle the windowsills and front door steps of many residential and commercial properties. One afternoon I watched teams of volunteers artistically arrange flowers and potted plants in fancy designs in a local square just for the viewing pleasure of the many young professionals who eat their lunches on the squares surrounding steps. In general there was a sense of calm in the city.

But there was one obvious difference that somewhat shatters the beautiful façade of Portland. Every 6 to 10 feet I encountered a person experiencing homelessness. A man, a woman, a child just sitting on the street. Some of them were clearly high, but many of them were not. One woman sat with a pad of paper and pencil in her hand but was stuck in a catatonic state of waiting for inspiration.  Some of them were panhandling, many of them were not. Children were coloring while their parents made signs displaying their person plight. Many people were laying with their pets. The thing that struck me every day was that for the size of Portland, the number of homeless is unbelievable. Most numbers estimate between 3400-3600 people sleep on the streets of Portland every night. The lack of affordable housing and the lack of enough shelter caused the governor of Oregon to declare a state of emergency which allows homeless to sleep on the street safely without being disrupted by police, business owners or residents. The city has seemed tolerant of this and understanding of the fact that there is simply no where to shelter all of these people.  It does beg the bigger question though.  Why are there so many?

It seems that no part of the city with has been spared by number of visibly a visible homeless. During our travels, we took an informal poll. People working at donut shops. our taxicabs driver, local lifetime residents etc. We simply asked “Why do you think there are so many homeless in Portland?”   Interestingly they all gave the same answer. They thought that because Portland was such an understanding and homeless friendly community, the people (particularly youth) were seeking out Portland as a counterculture experience. There is a pervasive feeling that these that the majority of the homeless in Portland wanted to be homeless for the experience. While many of those that we informally polled recognize that the legalization of recreational marijuana probably his added to the appeal of coming to Portland, none of them could say for certain the size of that effect. The locals seem particularly bothered that there were so many people with seemingly no end in sight. While they admitted that they felt ‘bad for the people’, they were relatively unsympathetic because they felt that this was a situation that has occurred by personal choice. When I attended a breakout session with people representing homelessness from all over the state of Oregon, I told them what the locals told us about the homeless problem in Portland. I asked if they felt that it was true; that there was a counterculture experience occurring and Portland happen to be the perfect place for it to occur. All of those representing Portland on the panel adamantly denied that any of what the common feeling was true. One CEO of a local if you federally qualified health center commented that while the summers are mild, the winters are very cold and rainy and no one would choose to be homeless and stay in Portland. I would say the same for people who are homeless in New England, in Pennsylvania, in Michigan. Many people endure these harsh winters and yet they don’t leave (which has puzzled me for years). There’s no migratory patterns for the homeless to fly south for the winter. While the truth likely lies somewhere in the middle of these two polarized viewpoints, this creates a particularly large problem for philanthropy. People do not donate to a cause in which they feel the misery of poverty is by choice. Frankly, the sympathy factor goes way down and when there’s no sympathy there’s no money. Perhaps some of the most important (and challenging) steps that Portland must take is changing public perception. Porland seems prime for the picking to lead the country in inovative solutions to minimize homelessness.  A combination of finances, a youthful open minded population with well-established social and healthcare services. I look forward to watching this city’s story unfold.  Press on Portland, press on.

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Portland, Oregon is a fascinating city situated on the eastern bank of the Willamette River under the watchful eye of Mount Hood.  As with any city that enjoys a river running through it, the bridges that accompany the river become part of the recognizable landscape that defines its character.  Every thursday night, an army of 150 volunteers turn the space under the Burnside Bridge into a hub of activity and services for Portland’s homeless.  I first learned about NightStrike more than 6 months ago as I was interviewing a prospective PA student who was at DeSales for an interview into our 2016 incoming class.  In high school, she had spent time volunteering under the Burnside Bridge with NightStrike and had sited it as a transformational experience that allowed her to see her own city in a different and profound way.  Brett and I were accepted as speakers at the 2016 National Health Care for the Homeless Conference and Policy Symposium in Portland, Oregon and I decided that NightStrike was something I needed to see for myself.

NightStrike is a program run by Bridgetown Inc and was founded by Executive Director Marshall Snider and his wife Lesley Snider (Program Director) 13 years ago. The organization has 5 employees (including Marshall and Lesley) and in addition to NIghtStrike, have developed several programs targeting the marginalized adults and children in the Portland area. NightStrike alone mobilized over 9600 volunteers serving over 20,000 people experiencing homelessness each year. We arrived at a rented church space near the Burnside Bridge around 630pm and immediately upon entering the orientation space, Marshall and Emily (Development Director) welcomed us to the Program. Orienting over 100 volunteers each Thursday is no small task.  I was impressed by the clear and concise message delivered by Marshall to all the volunteers. The purpose of NightStrike is “Because People Matter” and the common denominator that all humans need and desereve love. He pointed out that the volunteer needs the giving experience just as much as the person needs the blanket and encouraged each volunteer to learn the names and stories of the guests being served. To take on an “Oh there you are!”attitude instead of a “Look here I am” attitude. As an organizer of many volunteers, I particularly appreciated this piece because the message of your organization can be inadvertently misrepresented by the volunteers that are so eager to serve. Another staff member performed the reading of the rules (no photography, let religion come up naturally(if at all), show respect) and safety protocols (walk away from anything that makes you feel uncomfortable, three whistle blows means evacuate calmly and immediately etc).  We then broke into smaller orientation groups for our respective jobs. I was assigned to be a hostess while Brett, Laura, Seth and two friends from Ft. Worth were assigned to the clothing cart. After getting the run down, we all walked down to the bridge where, on average, 350 guests await. The path to the bridge cuts through a green spaces with bubble fountains along the river before arriving at the concrete slabs where we would set up shop.  Rows of Home Deopt style 6 ft tables were set up with folding chairs were already occupied by weary men and women. A mobile dental clinic and a separate mobile medical van created part of the perimeter of our space. The Willamette River and four  occupied barber chairs rounded out the perimeter. A food table with hot chili, drinks and coffee was the first stop for most guests. Other services available that night was a clothing table, library table (with new and used books for exchange), pet food table, a sewing table with two sewing machines to repair clothing, sleeping bags, tents and tarps. I even saw one woman repairing a hot dog costume for a dachshund pup that accompanied his owner everywhere.  There was a bike repair stand with everything from air pumps to tire tubes and chains.  5 volunteers carefully washed the feet of travelers while two more gave manicures to the women. A resource table and veterans table provided critical support for people trying to find their way.

My job was to chit chat with guests. I was strangely appreciative of the fact that I was not the health care provider for the night. I walked around with a thermos full of coffee and poured fresh cups for those waiting in line. I struck up a conversation with a larger than life character named George. A 6’3 black man with a large white beard and a fisherman’s hat. He had fashioned a handmade wooden cart to the back of his bicycle that was packed with elaborate handmade birdhouses.  He told me many tales that evening and emphisized the important points by leaning in, raising his eyebrows and pausing dramatically before letting out the most infectious laugh. During our conversation, many ofther guests stopped by to check out the birdhouses. While George didn’t speak to them, it was clear that he took pride in their interest.

Not all guests were like George. As one would imagine, the homeless are as diverse as we are. Some clean, some not. Some with clear responses to hallcuinations, some not. Some sat quietly, some didn’t. Some preached, some didn’t. But one woman struck me. At first glance, she looked slightly out of place with a fairly new looking hot pink fleece jacket, hair styled, and make up applied. I struck up a converstaion with her and on closer look noticed the all to familiar desperate sadeness in her eyes that comes with not really knowing how you ended up here. She did not reveal any of her story to me other than to say that you do what you have to do to survive.  With that, I poured her a cup of coffee and talked to her about the different resources in the city.

Poverty and how a city assists those who are trying to crawl out from a dark place is a fascinating, and often untold tale, of that which makes up the character of a city. Organizations like NightStrike quietly do the necessary not only to empower the guests, but to remind the volunteers that caring about the homeless population is not futile. In fact, a powerful thing happens when people are guided into being part of the solution.  Well done NightStrike. Well done.