Posts Tagged ‘PA’

A few weeks ago, Lehigh Valley Health Network and the Street Medicine Program hosted two events with Dr. Jim Withers, a pioneer of street medicine in the United States, to raise awareness about homelessness to different groups in the Lehigh Valley. The first night was a small gathering of donors at a local country club with Dr. Withers as the featured panelist along with Brett and Dr. Motley, chair of the Community Health Department at Lehigh Valley Hospital.  It was a fascinating discussion about how street medicine in many cities has uncovered an ugly truth; that healthcare itself is very, very sick.  Often times the Street Medicine provider straddles two worlds. A world of middle class America and a world of extreme poverty and isolation. In terms of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, we expect all patients to be functioning at the top of the pyramid in a place that Maslow defined as self-actualization. That is the place where people are achieving or are on their way to achieving their highest potential.  Because this is the basic assumption for all of those interacting with the healthcare system, it is no wonder that conscious or unconscious bias seeps in to our everyday patient interactions.  The traditional healthcare systems gets frustrated with those patients who just don’t or can’t follow through. We label them as non-compliant and design policies that allow us to dismiss patients from our practices after two no call no shows or after being late for an appointment a few too many times. Because after all, our clinical time is important and if we allow ‘them’ to be late then we are just enabling them.

Image result for maslow's hierarchy of needs

The homeless population and their interaction with the healthcare system is an example that can be applied to many other vulnerable populations who are expected to be functioning at the tip of Maslow’s pyramid. Domestic violence, gender dysphoria, substance abuse, financial instability and recent prison release are all examples of people are struggling to have their basic needs met. It was interesting to see and talk with the attendees at the conclusion of the panel discussion. Many of them have lived in this area their entire lives and never fully understood how and why this type of human condition was lurking in their own backyards. Perhaps the best part of the evening came from the country club bartender who spoke with me, Brett and Dr. Withers after the room had mostly cleared.  He shook our hands and told us that in his job, he listens to a lot of very boring presentations (and I believe him) but he was so grateful to have listened to this panel discussion.  He felt he had learned so much and went on to tell us about the homeless people he had known in his life and how he thought they may have ended up that way. Of all the people in the room, it seemed that perhaps the unsuspecting bartender had been one of the main benefactors of the event.

The following day, Dr. Withers gave grand rounds at the Hospital. Over 200 people RSVP’d to the event and the crowd was primarily full of short and long white coats.  At the conclusion of Dr. Withers discussion, a panel of currently or formerly homeless Lehigh Valley residents shared their stories of living on the streets, surviving on the streets and in our institutions and candidly shared how things could have been better.  One panelist has been unsheltered for over 9 years and shared that the Street Medicine team are the only people he knows that are not homeless.  This spoke to me particularly as I was reminded of the isolating nature of homelessness and the sense that the world can become ‘us’ and ‘they’ with seemingly very few bridges between. As I sat and listened, I noticed how absolutely silent it was in the room.  There was not a single pager ringing, phone buzzing or hushed side-conversation. Several hundred people who usually conversate all day were hanging on every single word these brave men and women shared.  I thought about how intimidating the room must have looked from the panelist table and that for years, the patients felt like no one listened to them. And yet, here we were, begging in earnest for them to tell us their stories. The power of this paradox is in its irony. Healthcare providers have an opportunity every day to listen to our patients stories. Not just the story of their symptoms. But THEIR story. We feel pressured to rush, to ‘work lean’, to make in through but in the end, that isn’t what anyone wants. Each time I see a room full of such talent hear the message of street medicine and the stories of its patient’s, I can’t help but feel the pull of a tide. That perhaps we are closer than we think to a return to the roots of good medicine and real connections with all of our patients.

Advertisements

Caterpillars are not particularly ferocious creatures. Slow and steady and according to my children, very hungry. I am not even sure that they make any noise at all. Or, come to think of it, have any teeth. They do their thing in their unassuming way and eventually make it to butterfly utopia. Silently and without bells or whistles, they make the world a more beautiful place. I have often marveled at the way passion can turn an otherwise quiet and unassuming human into a bull in a china closet. I am certain you have witnessed this phenomenon and it can happen to any of us. Once, while sitting in an ethics lecture some years back, a girl who I had never heard even speak suddenly found her voice and schooled the room about the seemingly double standard in the world regarding when life begins. Looking around, her point had not only been made, but her peers were blown away by the passion that was residing within her.

Advocates for many causes are much like the girl I just described. I remember a neighbor I had who loved animals. She always had a foster animal that she was rehabilitating for adoption. She would spend hours nursing the animal back to health. Once, I got up to go to the bathroom late at night only to glance out the window and see her sitting beneath a porch light picking fleas out of a sad lump of fur. I didn’t understand it then, but I do now. For some people, it is animals or organic food. The environment or breast cancer or autism or homelessness. World hunger, toxic waste or children in Africa. The cause is different but the root is the same. All causes need passion like this. It is what inspires other people to give two rats patooties about something they otherwise couldn’t care less about. I often think that I relate more to people who are passionate about SOMETHING (even if I fall into the rats patootie category about the cause) than those who are indifferent about EVERYTHING.

I am often asked how we do it all. I can see the look in people’s eyes as they ask the question. It is a third happy, a third bewildered and a third concerned. They know we have many clinics and homeless responsibilities. I myself work one full time job and two per diem jobs in addition to my obligations to the homeless. We have three children and other community responsibilities. I know why they are worried and why I am not. The answer is simple. I am compelled. I know that it is not I who is in charge of this master plan. Tenui nec dimmitam- latin for “I have taken hold and I will never let go.” This phrase reminds me to breathe easy, let it go (not the Frozen kind) and have courage.

Caterpillar roar.

I’ve never given a eulogy before. While preparing for his, I realized I really didn’t know much about him, but felt I understood him. The two words that best described him were courage and character. Not usually the first two words that come to mind when picturing a man who made his home in a drainage pipe for almost 5 years. He never left because he said, “It was a good spot.” In fact, none of the homeless providers knew who he was until the day he came into our hospital complaining of abdominal pain. At the time, it seemed like his life was finally turning around. He had a job. After months of trying, he got a job which required an almost 10 mile walk each way daily. He was saving his money and had an apartment picked out closer to his work so he could, “walk to it,” which always made be chuckle when he said it.

“Courage” describes him so well because the day I met him (in the hospital) was the day I told him he had a terminal illness and only a few months to live. He smiled his crooked smile that I would see so much over the next few months, shrugged his shoulders, and said, “Well, I guess that’s the way it goes….. What do I do now?” At first I wasn’t sure he understood what I just said so I repeated it and his reaction made me understand that he did understand, and simply had a degree of bravely rarely seen. He asked me what they would do with him after he dies. I honestly wasn’t sure so I asked what he would like us to do. He said all he wanted was a box with a cross on it but nothing else. He also told me he was Catholic but hasn’t attended church in about 15 years and wanted to know if it was ok to see a priest.

We told some of the local landlords about his situation and helped with getting an apartment for $250 a month so he wouldn’t have to spend his last days in the drainage pipe, no matter how good of a spot it was. He saw me at least weekly in the soup kitchen and was visited by our hospice nurse much more often in his new apartment. We also arranged for him to go into our inpatient hospice unit whenever he wanted, even if it meant his stay could last months, which isn’t the normal procedure for an inpatient hospice unit. He said he would stay out as long as he could so the people who were sicker than him could have the bed. By making that decision, it meant he would continue to struggle finding food daily, walking miles to different soup kitchens even as he grew weaker. I soon learned that his weekly walk to see me at the soup kitchen was the barometer he used to tell him when it was time to enter the hospice unit.

As time went on he grew so weak he could no longer make the walk to see me, was vomiting all food and drink, and was even having trouble getting around his apartment. Also, the heat broke in his apartment—in January—which he said didn’t bother him because he still had a bed and 4 walls, which is more than he had the last 5 year. With his nurses help, we convinced him to go to the hospice unit and he agreed. He wouldn’t go until he cleaned his apartment, packed up all his belongings, and took it to the shelter to give them to someone who needed them. We tried to talk him out of the strenuous task of cleaning when he was barely able to walk but he wouldn’t hear of it. The landlord was so nice to rent to him at such a low price he couldn’t leave the apartment dirty, he said. When I think of his strong character, I consider that for a man who had so little in life, and was now so close to death, his biggest concerns was for the sicker people in the hospital than he, the other homeless who were more in need of clothes than he, and not violating the trust of his landlord who first showed trust in him.

While delivering my eulogy I looked out in the full seats in the funeral home and was struck by how many people he brought together. All of his caretakers and an old acquaintance from high school came to say goodbye with a priest presiding in front of his beautiful box with a cross adorning the top. In the end, he got all he wanted, and we received a lesson of a lifetime.

-BF

When I was younger, I remember driving in the car across the country with my parents. I spent most of my childhood living in Kansas and Indiana but spending major holidays outside of Pittsburgh. This meant many long car rides and my mental curiosity (and predilection for asking endless questions) meant a constant stream of conciousness in the car (God bless my parents). I remember traveling down some road just off the interstate looking for a place to eat and passing a sting of ‘hotels’. I asked my parents if we were sleeping at each one- one after the other and of course the answer was no. In hindsight, they looked like aweful places to sleep with there run down fascade, their “No Vacancy” light that is missing the N, V, C and Y, their broken down cars in the parking lot and a predilection for worn out lawn chairs adorning each side of the door. How welcoming. My mother called these a ‘No-Tell Motel’ and it was only after I got older that I knew what she meant.

Most of us probrably think the same thing when we pass by these establishments that offer a cheap weekly rate, bring your pets, bring your cigarettes and whoever else you want since the front desk clerk seems to only be half in this universe and half somewhere else. An inherant bias that nothing good is happening behind those closed doors and the people who reside there are either up to no good or don’t have anywhere else to be. And afterall, idelness never leads to anything good. To be fair, I have stayed in some of these establishments in my travels and can report that nothing ill befell me, but the sour taste still remains even after plenty evidence of the contrary. Old habits, as they say, die hard.

Below is a story from Brett about how wrong we may be about the goings-on in the local No-Tell Motel. It has been edited with his permission and all relevent names have been changed.

Tom * is a 70 guy who wound up on the street medicine service after i discovered he was homeless during his nursinghome stay a few weeks ago. He worked as a truck driver his entire life until 2008 when he retired. He initially had an apartment after he retired but developed gangrene in his right leg requiring an amputation and a necrotic left heel ulcer requiring multiple surgeries. Almost all of his medical issues are related to his uncontrolled diabetes. He’s been in and out of Lehigh Valley Hospital and St. Luke’s for almost a year and was unable to keep his apartment as a result of his frequent hospitalizations. (kind of challenges that whole notion that the homeless are just alcoholics who eventually had to pay the piper huh?) He does get about $900/ month in social security, but the lowest cost apartments are $700/ month and his meds cost over $200/ month. With no support system, no family, and only 1 friend in a similar situation as his own, he became homeless.

After a recent hospitalization, he was discharged a few weeks ago from a local short term rehab facility to a “no-tell” motel. I pass this motel often and think about how horrible it looks, and the bed bug infestation that must be occurring as I drive by. My suspicions were confirmed by reviews of Trip Advisor and I wonder how anyone would let a human they cared for stay there. Not only is Tim 70 years old with severely uncontrolled DM but he also has a severe tremor making it impossible to check his own sugars. The rehab facility discharged him to the motel with all of his meds, but no supplies to monitor his sugars even if he had the ability. He also had no hime care services set up- no visiting nurse, no meals on wheels.

I visited him the day after discharge and brought him diabetic supplies and supplies to care for his leg wound. I was appalled at the condition in which he was living. He had no access to food and was living off pizza from the shop next door. His fluids consisted on soda from the machine outside his room. The bottle then became a urinal and he had multiple bottles of urine stacked up by his bed. He assured me he would be ok, which of course I didn’t believe, so I returned the next day. Upon my return I found him and his room covered in vomit and he looked like he was going to die. I checked his blood sugar and the meter read, “HI,” meaning his blood sugar was greater than 600. He adamantly refused to go to the hospital because he, “had it with those people and would rather die.” I cleaned him up and brought him some food, but despite my pleading, he stayed.

I called Area Agency on Aging, the VNA, and the Conference of Churches, anyone I could think of who might be able to help me. Two days later I returned to find him looking MUCH better. It turned out that over the past two days the motel clerk and another motel resident had been helping to feed and bathe him. They dressed his wound with the supplies I left, administered his meds to him, and cared for him like a family member. A few other motel residents who were diabetic were coming to check on him regularly.

I thought about community building that occurs when one is all alone, similar to the communities I find in the encampments. If I give a sandwich to someone who is hungry, they will always share with their friends. I don’t know if the same type support and love shown for my patient would have happened at the $200 a night hotel down the street. I realized my own unconscious bias for this motel and will never look at it the same again and I give credit to the fellow inhabitants of the no-tell motel who supported this man when our system let him down.

I stand corrected.

Yesterday afternoon, a few of my co-workers and I were walking to a picnic held on the DeSales University campus. We were admiring the beautiful weather and the beautiful surroundings. Despite my love for the urban and rural homeless population, I have to admit it is a quiet retreat to spend time on this beautiful campus of rolling hills and beautiful fields.We noted a tree that was already changing it’s leaves. This launched a whole discussion about how everything is in a hurry- A.C. Moore already has Christmas decorations for sale and emails are jamming my inbox with taglines reminding me how many Fridays are left until Christmas. I, for one, have never really enjoyed winter. If the weather could stop at late October and blend right into April, I would be happy. The prediction for our area this year is another unbearably cold winter with higher than average snowfall. Putting my own last winter-related, generator-finding-polar-vortex-enduring PTSD aside, I think to the other work in my life.

It was a Sunday at the end of February 2014.   Brett’s cell phone rang and it was Jackie, a parish nurse who works with Brett at the Soup Kitchen Clinic. She was calling because she had a patient with her who was desperate to find someone named Corinne who normally takes care of him. She wanted to know if Brett knew who this Corinne person was. Much to her surprise, he passed the phone to his right and she got her answer. It seemed that Kevin* had been asked to leave the homeless shelter he was previously staying in. He had violated one of their rules and as Kevin said, “That was that.” He was out of medications but more importantly, he was out of shelter . The only other place to find shelter was over full and Kevin had been denied entrance the prior two nights. The temperatures were drastically low and he was scared and cold. He had only been able to take the belongings that he had near his bed. All of his items in storage, he told me, were discarded. Imagine the attachment you would have to your belongings if you could count all of them on your own two hands. More concerning, Kevin suffered from incontinence. Not having a reliable place to use the restroom and clean clothes to change into worsened the situation.

Kevin has been my patient for the last two years. He comes to the Clinic religiously every Tuesday for a blood pressure check. The blood pressure check almost always reveals more information about his week, his life and his other medication conditions. Despite his chronic incontinence, he always smelled like cologne. Kevin was compliant, he was never late for an appointment I had set up for him and he never ran out of his medications. He is talkative, polite and wonderful with the students. He had often told me he liked helping the students get their education. The students felt responsible for Kevin, but Kevin also felt responsible for the students.

Kevin and I agreed to meet on Tuesday. I went to my PA students and explained Kevin’s situation. Most of the students knew him from the Free Clinic and were deeply saddened to think of him sleeping on the street. I could see it in their faces- homelessness just got real.

Being that Kevin is a very tall man, finding clothes for him would be difficult. But the students rallied and came up with clothes, toiletries, snacks and other things they thought he would need. I arrived to meet him a few minutes early. In a strange change in weather, the polar vortex had given way to an unseasonably warm that day with a high of 62. I had not even worn a coat as I walked from my car to the building and I passed a few overzealous locals in shorts and tank tops. A few minutes later, I looked out the double glass doors to see a man dressed like the Abominable Snowman. He was struggling with the heavy doors and as I walked closed to help him, I realized it was Kevin.

Everything he owned was literally layered on his body or crammed into a messenger bag that was ripped down one side. Over the course of 10 minutes, he removed from his body 4 winter hats/hoods, two pairs of gloves (both ripped), a puffy winter coat, a leather jacket, a windbreaker, two sweatshirts, a button up collared dress shirt and a long sleeved t-shirt. He had on three pairs of pants, all of which were soaked with urine. What bothered me more than his layers, was his facial expression. Minimal eye contact, soft voice. No smile, no light hearted upbeat Kevin. The Kevin was lost, buried in the pile of clothes sitting beside him. A sadness filled his eyes. He told me he was so embarrassed for me to see him this way, embarrassed to walk the streets literally wearing everything he owned. He didn’t know what to do, where to go. He was desperate. Then his phone rang and it was his mother. She wanted to talk to me. I could hear it in her voice. She begged. She pleaded. “Find him somewhere to sleep tonight! Please! Why isn’t there anywhere else for him to go? Where are all the other people who are homeless?” Her questions were valid. Her frantic tone of voice was justified. Her disbelief that we have nowhere to put our homeless at night. I apologized, I justified, I rationalized, I validated. But in the end, I had no answers.

Then it was my turn to beg and plead. Could he come home to her? Were there resources for homeless in her town? Could she think of a family member, a friend, anyone who would take him in? All the answers were no. And while she wouldn’t elaborate as to why, I could sense that her answer was non-negotiable. There was no answer for Kevin that night. He had nowhere to stay and nowhere to go. It was gut wrenching. As a health care provider, I felt horrible. As a mom, I cannot imagine laying in my bed at night wondering if my son was sleeping outside in the cold. As a friend, I felt helpless. I could work no miracles that night. He slept outside behind a YMCA and waited for another day.

Eventually, we were able to convince the shelter that had asked him to leave to reconsider their decision. Kevin was permitted to return to the shelter and has been diligently working on filling out government paperwork, attending doctor’s appointments and applying for housing. Last week, he proudly reported that he had work with a local resource to update his resume and had interviewed for three jobs. Progress was being made and I am so proud of his recovery trajectory. As summer fades to fall, I know that Old Man Winter is waiting just around the corner. He lurks and just when you have almost forgotten the bone chilling cold that makes you want to pack up and move South for good, he snaps you back into His frosty world reminding me that “Walking In A Winter Wonderland” could have only been written by a person who was housed.