Posts Tagged ‘Boston’

Four years ago, we attended our first International Street Medicine Symposium in Boston (MA). I was wide eyed, excited and in hindsight- mostly clueless about the real world of street medicine. Street medicine in the Lehigh Valley did not exist yet, I had never been on street rounds and had only read about such legends in this area of medincine such as Dr. Jim Withers and Dr. Jim O’Connell. I met like minded people and heard tales of incredible collaboration between civil services, shelters, providers and consumers. I saw demonstrations of how humility combined with leadership can change an entire city and its citizens. And I do mean all of them – the housed and unhoused, the voting and non-voting, the overachieving students and the retired sunset-riders who directly or indirectly reaped the benefit of the Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP). In the subsequent years, we travelled to Dublin, Ireland then San Jose, California and most recently- Geneva, Switzerland. Each conference provided new insights, new data, new frameworks, new friendships. As Dr. Pat Perri, chair of the Street Medicine Institute said at the most recent conference in Geneva- it is like meeting aliens from the same planet.

As I sit on my flight returning from Geneva, I am struck by the lecture I had the privilege of hearing yesterday by Nick Maguire (Southampton, UK). He is a psychologist with a brilliant mind and a wicked English sense of humor who has a way of making sense of the behavior chaos that we observe on a regular basis on the streets and in the shelters. His points were so profound to me that I have hardly been able to think of much else. But as he started his lecture, he told us how much this conference means to him. As he says, it is a bucket filler when the world is so often full of bucket emptiers. We come to this conference and are renewed with our sense of purpose and inspired by the brilliant minds from all across the globe that have so committed themselves to such a worthy cause. People who have left lucrative positions in pursuit of a meaningful contribution. People who risk arrest by providing medical care on the street. People who accept that possibility that everyone you know professionally and personally might think that you are crazy for doing this type of work.
As Nick was speaking, I glanced over my right shoulder and saw Jim Withers sitting toward the back of the room as he so often does and thought about how it feels to know that your vision is being shared and LIVED by so many people. Inspiration can be a fickle thing- there one day, and then gone the next. Sometimes people act on their inspiration but, action can also be fleeting. It is inspiration that makes us come back from church camp when we were kids and throw away all of our excess toys, cd’s (back when we used such antiquated objects to listen to music) and other items we deemed unnecessary once we realized that living a simpler life for a week wasn’t so bad after all. But three months later, there we are in our rooms with piles of newly accumulated junk that we forgot we had decided we could live without. Fleeting. But to inspire and then foster inspiration that changes the trajectory of how people LIVE is something quite different. And for me, the International Street Medicine Symposium is like inspiration on Arnold Schwartzeneger dosed steroids.

Thanks Street Medicine Institute. Bucket filled. Lid applied. Pressing on.

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Sitting on a tarmac outside of the Newark NJ airport, I am trying to wait patiently for my plane to take off. I hear mostly white noise as people are shuffling to their seats and stuffing oversized bags into small overhead compartments. I look to my right and see a recent DeSales PA Program graduate sitting a few seats away. In the midst of our boarding process, I hear words being shared about street medicine and homelessness to the unsuspecting middle seat passenger. In 6 hours, Seth could have her convinced to attend the 11th Annual International Street Medicine Conference with us.

 

While I don’t often spend much time reflecting back on progress over time, I find that preparing for conferences like these tends to send me back to a time when I knew less in both knowledge and people. Two years ago, Brett and I attended our first International Street Medicine Symposium in Boston. We had read so much about the world-renowned Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) founded and flourished by Dr. Jim O’Connell. I had followed their website for years and had a visit to BHCHP on my bucket list for years. (Hey, some people sky dive, I visit homeless programs.) The opportunity presented itself for this visit with just a few weeks notice. Generous support from both of our sponsoring institutions (to let us go) and family (to keep our kids) allowed Brett and I to travel that Fall to Boston. It was the first time we were able to see a mature and robust healthcare for the homeless program and see first hand how something like that is grown and cultivated over time. Each member of BHCHP seemed to share the vision that had begun more than 20 years before. They were motivated, enthusiastic and committed. At a dinner reception after the first day, Brett and I met Dr. Jim O’Connell for the first time. He was genuinely interested in our small but eager programs. I mentioned that the DeSales Free Clinic has an operational budget of about $18,000. I’ll never forget his response. “You do all of that with $18,000? I have a multimillion dollar budget. It sounds like I have something to learn for you.” I was dumbfounded. You? Learn something from me? It sounded laughable ( and still does) but he was sincere. And a reflection of how all Street Medicine Programs are treated by their peers. This type of interaction has been repeated many times over as street medicine programs come from all over the world, once a year, to learn, share, eat, drink and be merry. Dr. Jim Withers of Operation Safety Net (Pittsburgh, PA) once told me that he thinks that people at this conference and his patients sometimes understand him better than his family. (True)

Now, we are heading to San Jose (CA) for this years conference. Our programs have grown exponentially since that first trip to Boston. So many ideas were illuminated, so many seeds planted. We are travelling with 8 other street medicine team members- 2 University of South Florida SELECT medical students, 2 DeSales University physician assistant students, 2 recent graduates of the DeSales PA Program, LVHN Street Medicine’s new case manager and new clinical coordinator. It is hard to imagine the life trajectories that can change when armed with the knowledge that comes from conferences like these. Brett and I sometimes joke that it feels like you are going away to camp. The time is short, the bond is strong.

In the Spring of 2013, Brett came across a conference being held in Washington, DC a few weeks later. We scrambled with our employees and our families to find coverage for the many hats we wear and off we went to the National HealthCare for the Homeless Council conference.  I have been to many, many educational conferences in my professional career and I can say that up until that point, none of them would be described as life changing.  Prior to our attendance, we had been running the DeSales Free Clinic since 2007 but had not really met other people who were doing the same things. Two things happened at that conference that changed the trajectory of our lives.

First, we were able to see that what we had created at the DeSales Free Clinic was as comprehensive and well thought out as many of the programs who were presenting their healthcare models at the conference. We always felt in our hearts that what we were offering was logical and right but we really had nothing to compare ourselves to. The second thing was that we were able to meet all of these people that were offering healthcare to their homeless population in ways we had never even thought of.

It was like a mental explosion.

I remember sitting at a restaurant with Brett after the conference was over.  We made a plan at lunch that day about what we wanted homelessness medicine to look like in our area. It was suddenly blinding that what we were doing was great but there was SO MUCH MORE that needed to be done. More people, more locations, more populations, more awareness. For both of us, a sudden and sharp vision (blessing)was born.

We wanted to start with developing a Street Medicine Program. We don’t really know how to do anything small and so considering starting something in a logical-one-step-at-a-time method is a nice theory but we know we’ll blow it right out of the gate. We knew that the biggest job was two fold- 1) convince important decision makers that the Lehigh Valley has a homelessness problem and 2) Get buy in for this never-heard-of-it-before type of medicine called Street Medicine.

A few months after the NHCHC conference, we attended the International Street Medicine Symposium in Boston, MA. Again- mind blown. The benchmark program- Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program- hosted the conference and I thought our heads were going to explode on the car ride home.

Today, Brett starts as a full time Street Medicine PA in the Lehigh Valley Health Network Street Medicine Program. He has worked tirelessly at the hospital and had more meetings in the last year than I think he ever thought possible. It’s funny but Brett is more of a do-er and less of a talk-er but he knew that he had to get people to see the vision as clearly as it lived in our heads. He met with grants people, finance people, security people, mechanics, community partners, HR, PR, IT, development, department chairs, managers…he learned about departments that we never knew even existed. And amazing people who were willing to help in any way that they could to give this idea legs.  Their eyes were opened and all of a sudden, they couldn’t imagine why we hadn’t thought of this sooner. He did lunch meetings, breakfast meetings, stand in the hall and chat meetings. The goal was to create an idea so big that once your ready to ‘go live’, it would be nearly impossible to stop. Their eyes were opened and all of a sudden, they couldn’t imagine why we hadn’t thought of this sooner.

Everyone has a different dream and I feel like very few get to wake up and do what is living in their heart all day. There is a pure joy that escapes unabashedly out of a person when they are doing what they love. Today is that day for Brett.  Dream big or don’t dream at all.

” It ain’t about the money you make, when a record gets sold, It’s about doin’ it for nothin’, ’cause it lives in your soul.”  – Eric Church

The weather has always baffeled me. In a strange way, weather has a way of forcing you into the next phase of the year, ready or not. Saturday had temps in the 90s with humidity so high that it made my normally very straight hair resemble the before shot of an antifrizz hair product commercial. Heavy rains came Saturday night and just like that, Fall arrived. Football, crisp morning air, windows open.  

Last Fall, Brett and I attended our first Street Medicine Symposium in Boston. The Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program has been the program that all others compare themselves to. It is a huge, well established program that has the most comprehensive programs, resources and street teams. The tentacles of this program seem to reach into all the parks, shelters, hospitals etc. To say we learned a lot would be a stupid understatement.  I recall having a conversation with Dr. Jim O’Connell, president and founding physician of the Boston program.  We were talking about funding (of course) and I said I was amazed at the multi million dollar budget of his program.  He inquired as to the budget of the DeSales Free Clinic and the scope of services. After I told him our annual operating budget was $15,000 he response was ” jeez, we must be doing something wrong if we need so much money”. We then talked about how we operate on limited funds. This is the attitude in Street Medicine – no matter how big or small your program is, fledgling or benchmark status, we can all learn from each other.

A unique feature of these conferences is participating in street rounds with the hosting institution. We really got to see how the pros get it done. I was rounding with a case manager who was looking for one patient in particular- John. She had not been able to find him for the last two weeks and was worried about him. We checked all the usual places that he hung out. We met his street friends who had much to tell us – except for where John was. And so our search continued.

It was about 6pm and downtown Boston was bustling with people leaving work. The streets and the crosswalks were very crowded, horns blaring, quick feet. At a particularly busy intersection, we began to cross just as we see a large dip form in the sea of humanity. As we approached, we saw that our lost patient- John- was right at our feet.  Wheelchair bound, he had lost his balance and tipped right out of his wheelchair and onto the ground. I was impresssed at the number of busy Bostonians who stopped to help him and make sure traffic would not hit him when the light changed to green. We scooped John back into his chair and moved him to the sidewalk. 

John was a rather imposing figure, both in size and in scowl. When you close your eyes and picture a chronically homeless man on a wheelchair, you are likely picturing John. Standing, he was most likely over 6 feet tall. He was wearing many layers of well worn and tattered clothing. He had on an old navy blue winter hat that was a little lopsided so only one eyebrow was showing. He was missing most of his teeth and had a rosy hue to his deeply wrinkled skin. He was not particularly friendly toward me and answered the case managers questions in a short and gruff tone. Yes he had been drinking. No, he didn’t need anything. No, he wasn’t hurt. Then she asked if he was hungry- and for a second, the fiercly guarded wall came down. He was hungry, and thirsty too.  He hadn’t eaten in several days. 

While the case manager went into a Panera Bread, I had a chance to talk to John (or attempt). I started by trying to figure out if he needed anything else since it seemed the peace offering of food had opened the door just a smidge. He told me part of the reason he had a hard time eating despite the available soup kitchens and food vans was that he had a peanut allergy. A severe peanut allergy. Imagine the great lengths moms across America go to in order protect their childreen from inadvertant peanut ingestion. There is even a service through my children’s daycare to find them a playdate with a child whose allergies match your childs ( think match.com but for kids with allergies). Before John, I had never considered what it would be like to have a food allergy on the street. I asked him a few questions about his peanut allergy and then, apparently, crossed the threshold of number of questions allowed.  

I had squatted down to talk to him. Being at the same eyelevel of someone who is wheelchair bound (homeless or not) is extremely important for leveling the playing field. Suddenly, John looked angry. He was nose to nose with me and yelled with a slurred speech, ” Do you reaaaaaaallllllllyyyyy care?” Pause. ” Well, do ya?!” I told him that I really did care. He looked away and muttered, “Well, I don’t know why.” 

There was they key to this whole interaction. Imagine wanting to be helped but feeling inside that you are so worthless that no one in their right mind should want to help you. Therefore, you prophylactically refuse the help because somewhere inside of you, you believe that you are protecting yourself from the inevitable. The dissapointment you will feel when the person decides you aren’t worth it and that they don’t care. Self preservation is a vital survival tool when living on the streets.

We walked with John to a location across town that he liked to hang out ( we had actually been there earlier that day looking for him). He was greeted warmly by his street brothers. A fleeting smile crossed his eyes (but not his lips). As we walked away, I turned back to see John breaking his sandwhich into four pieces – one for him and one for each of his street friends while they passed the bottle of newly purchased lemonade around. A reminder that the parable of the fishes and the loaves is lived every day on the street.