We have been experiencing extremely cold temperatures over the past week, with the early mornings and evenings below 0 degrees. There is obvious risk of severe injury and death for our patients who choose to stay outside. We always attempt to meet them on their terms and respect the decisions they make, but first try to bring them in to safety. This was the goal when I arrived at Safe Harbor at 8:00AM- we needed to go to the camps by the river and try to get those folks to come in with us for a meal and a warm, safe place. The parking lot around back also serves as a meeting place for the guests to congregate but mostly smoke. After I pulled in, I got out of my truck I was greeted by one of the residence, “Hey, are we doing that homeless thing today?!?” The initial thoughts that rushed through my mind were, “What homeless thing,” and then, “Wait, aren’t you homeless (which of course he was)?” At that moment it occurred to me that the manner in which we carry out street rounds is so inclusive, that the area homeless are beginning to feel a part of it and are making it their own.

The way we perform street rounds varies from day to day based on the locations and the people we are going to visit. At times it’s better to have a small group- usually myself and at least 2 other guides. When we go out around Easton the mood is much different. Tyler, the Director of the large area shelter, Safe Harbor, is extremely well known. Almost all of the people we come across are either known to Tyler or know of Tyler. Because of this familiarity, when we travel around Easton my goal is to be more inclusive. Helping those most in need is difficult and requires full community involvement. Sometimes, the person in need feels alienated from the community. When the situation is right, we’ve found it to be extremely effective to bring the community with us to welcome them. When this happens, the community takes ownership over all of its members, and the previously alienated member feels less that way. There are times when we set out with 4 or 5 people on street rounds. As we visit various camps, we ask the homeless to join us on street rounds culminating in a trip to Safe Harbor for food, shelter, showers and even job assistance. Sometimes we return with 10-15 people. It is this approach that led this resident of Safe Harbor to feel, and rightfully so, that he too was an outreach worker and despite his current situation in life, he is still valuable enough to give back to those less fortunate.

When we set out this morning, I thought I was part of the street medicine program, but as we approached a tent with two very cold people sleeping inside and the same resident yelled from the outside, “We are the homeless posse here to bring you in!” I knew what group I was really working with that day. And we were much stronger than any medication in my backpack.

~BF

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