The “No-Tell Motel”

Posted: October 14, 2014 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , ,

When I was younger, I remember driving in the car across the country with my parents. I spent most of my childhood living in Kansas and Indiana but spending major holidays outside of Pittsburgh. This meant many long car rides and my mental curiosity (and predilection for asking endless questions) meant a constant stream of conciousness in the car (God bless my parents). I remember traveling down some road just off the interstate looking for a place to eat and passing a sting of ‘hotels’. I asked my parents if we were sleeping at each one- one after the other and of course the answer was no. In hindsight, they looked like aweful places to sleep with there run down fascade, their “No Vacancy” light that is missing the N, V, C and Y, their broken down cars in the parking lot and a predilection for worn out lawn chairs adorning each side of the door. How welcoming. My mother called these a ‘No-Tell Motel’ and it was only after I got older that I knew what she meant.

Most of us probrably think the same thing when we pass by these establishments that offer a cheap weekly rate, bring your pets, bring your cigarettes and whoever else you want since the front desk clerk seems to only be half in this universe and half somewhere else. An inherant bias that nothing good is happening behind those closed doors and the people who reside there are either up to no good or don’t have anywhere else to be. And afterall, idelness never leads to anything good. To be fair, I have stayed in some of these establishments in my travels and can report that nothing ill befell me, but the sour taste still remains even after plenty evidence of the contrary. Old habits, as they say, die hard.

Below is a story from Brett about how wrong we may be about the goings-on in the local No-Tell Motel. It has been edited with his permission and all relevent names have been changed.

Tom * is a 70 guy who wound up on the street medicine service after i discovered he was homeless during his nursinghome stay a few weeks ago. He worked as a truck driver his entire life until 2008 when he retired. He initially had an apartment after he retired but developed gangrene in his right leg requiring an amputation and a necrotic left heel ulcer requiring multiple surgeries. Almost all of his medical issues are related to his uncontrolled diabetes. He’s been in and out of Lehigh Valley Hospital and St. Luke’s for almost a year and was unable to keep his apartment as a result of his frequent hospitalizations. (kind of challenges that whole notion that the homeless are just alcoholics who eventually had to pay the piper huh?) He does get about $900/ month in social security, but the lowest cost apartments are $700/ month and his meds cost over $200/ month. With no support system, no family, and only 1 friend in a similar situation as his own, he became homeless.

After a recent hospitalization, he was discharged a few weeks ago from a local short term rehab facility to a “no-tell” motel. I pass this motel often and think about how horrible it looks, and the bed bug infestation that must be occurring as I drive by. My suspicions were confirmed by reviews of Trip Advisor and I wonder how anyone would let a human they cared for stay there. Not only is Tim 70 years old with severely uncontrolled DM but he also has a severe tremor making it impossible to check his own sugars. The rehab facility discharged him to the motel with all of his meds, but no supplies to monitor his sugars even if he had the ability. He also had no hime care services set up- no visiting nurse, no meals on wheels.

I visited him the day after discharge and brought him diabetic supplies and supplies to care for his leg wound. I was appalled at the condition in which he was living. He had no access to food and was living off pizza from the shop next door. His fluids consisted on soda from the machine outside his room. The bottle then became a urinal and he had multiple bottles of urine stacked up by his bed. He assured me he would be ok, which of course I didn’t believe, so I returned the next day. Upon my return I found him and his room covered in vomit and he looked like he was going to die. I checked his blood sugar and the meter read, “HI,” meaning his blood sugar was greater than 600. He adamantly refused to go to the hospital because he, “had it with those people and would rather die.” I cleaned him up and brought him some food, but despite my pleading, he stayed.

I called Area Agency on Aging, the VNA, and the Conference of Churches, anyone I could think of who might be able to help me. Two days later I returned to find him looking MUCH better. It turned out that over the past two days the motel clerk and another motel resident had been helping to feed and bathe him. They dressed his wound with the supplies I left, administered his meds to him, and cared for him like a family member. A few other motel residents who were diabetic were coming to check on him regularly.

I thought about community building that occurs when one is all alone, similar to the communities I find in the encampments. If I give a sandwich to someone who is hungry, they will always share with their friends. I don’t know if the same type support and love shown for my patient would have happened at the $200 a night hotel down the street. I realized my own unconscious bias for this motel and will never look at it the same again and I give credit to the fellow inhabitants of the no-tell motel who supported this man when our system let him down.

I stand corrected.

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